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Journal of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 287-293

Outcomes and survival of spinal metastasis with epidural compression


1 Department of Medical Clinics, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
2 Division of Clinical Oncology, Department of Medical Images, Hematology and Clinical Oncology, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
3 Department of Orthopaedic and Anesthesiology, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

Correspondence Address:
Rômulo Pedroza Pinheiro
Department of Orthopaedic and Anesthesiology, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, Monte Alegre, 14049900, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo
Brazil
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jcvjs.jcvjs_33_21

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Objective: The goal of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the demographics, clinical manifestation, outcomes, treatment result, and survival of patients with spinal metastasis with epidural metastasis who underwent surgical treatment. Materials and Methods: A retrospective evaluation of 103 patients with spinal metastasis and epidural compression who underwent surgical treatment between 2009 and 2015 was performed. The recorded parameters selected for the study were general demographic data (gender, age, and educational level) and clinical data (primary tumor, performance status according to Karnofsky score, neurological status according to Frankel scale, pain, surgical treatment outcomes, and patient survival). Results: The mean age of the patients was 55.28 ± 15.79 years, and spinal metastasis was more frequent in males (61.7%). The two most frequent tumors were malignant breast cancer (26.21%) and prostate cancer (22.33%). Preoperative pain was presented in 96 (94.12%) patients and improvement was observed in 44 (47.31%) patients. Symptoms of spinal cord compression were the initial clinical manifestation of the primary tumor in 35 (33.98%) patients. Neurological deficit was observed in 66 (64.07%) patients, and improvement was observed in 43 (41.74%) patients. Improvement of functional outcome and pain was observed in 34 (37.38%) patients. The mean survival was 12.26 months. Longer survival (mean 19.13 months) was observed in patients who showed improvement in their ability to walk or kept it preserved (Frankel D or E). Conclusions: Surgical treatment of spinal metastasis can improve pain and functional activities. Longer survival was observed in patients that keep or recovery the walking ability.


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